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Facade of Trumbull School on Foster Avenue, 1908
Delivery wagons next to Gengler store on Summerdale at Clark, 1902
1908 building on Clark at Balmoral having the brick facade replaced
The first Edgewater Hospital building ca 1930
2009 Kitchen Exhibit at the Museum
Firehouse at Balmoral & Ashland
Firetruck housed at the original firehouse
2011 Edgewater Grocery Stores Exhibit
Greenhouses in the 1930s
Andersonville school view looking south down Ashland 1880
2010 Home Tour (Edgewater North)
Parade on Clark Street, 1966
Maybelline building at Ridge and Clark, ca. 1930s
Postcard of original Edgewater Post Office on Broadway at Catalpa
Postcard of Senn High School prior to the additions, ca. 1920
Saddle & Cycle Club at Foster Ave. 1900
Saddle & Cycle Club at Foster Ave. 1900
Postcard of Edgewater Beach Hotel, pre-1923
Postcard of Edgewater Beach Hotel Yacht Club
2010 Memorial Day Parade

New exhibit: As Time Goes By in Edgewater - 1885 to the Present

“As Time Goes By” is the title of the newest exhibit at the Edgewater Historical Society Museum, 5358 N. Ashland, which opens the weekend of May 28, and will continue for many months.

The exhibit features 150 photos of the story of Edgewater from 1885 to the present. A special section tells the story of the Edgewater Beach Hotel. In the months to come there will be more features on the Schools and Churches in Edgewater.

The exhibit will be open during regular museum hours, but special tours may be arranged for a small donation.

New exhibit: The Best of Broadway and Lost Broadway

No street dominates Edgewater like Broadway. The thoroughfare has gone through a number of eras over the past 130 years, and has left behind a rich array of architecture. From early Greystone three-flats to elaborate Jazz Age auto dealerships, Broadway is one of Chicago’s most unique galleries of durable commercial and residential buildings. Now the Edgewater Historical Society is excited to share a new photographic look at many of the street’s old classics – The Best of Broadway. [more...]

New Exhibit: Indigenous Edgewater: Exploring Native History

EHS presents our newest exhibit, “Indigenous Edgewater - Exploring Native History.” The exhibit documents Indigenous culture from 10,000 years ago to the present day. The Indigenous Edgewater exhibit will be available on Saturdays and Sundays from 1 to 4 p.m. at 5358 N. Ashland Ave.

Natives have lived in the Edgewater area for over 10,000 years. Marsha Holland, exhibit co-curator, discusses Native history in the greater Edgewater area, focusing on the archeological findings of Bowmanville Village and beyond. To view, click here.

Without Natives, would we have Chicago as we know it? Marjorie Fritz-Birch, exhibit co-curator, explores Native contributions to the greater Edgewater area and beyond. To view, click here.

"Remembering Edgewater Beach Hotel" interviews

There have been two recent radio interviews with Kathy Gemperle and John Holden, the authors of “Remembering Edgewater Beach Hotel.” If you want to hear the interviews, they can be found at:

WGN Radio: After Hours with Rick Hogan on July 25, 2021

WCPT Radio: Where Are They Now with Art Andros on November 20, 2021

Virtual Museum exhibits

EHS MuseumWe invite you on a virtual curator’s tour of our recent exhibits:

Edgewater Beach Hotel: 100 Years Later

The Chicago Conspiracy Trial: One Juror’s Ordeal

High Water and Hell: Rising Lake Puts Chicago on Edge

Here is another past exhibit you may remember:

Greetings from Edgewater (2012): description and video

Lincoln in Edgewater event (Past)

In the mid-1800s, the current Senn Park location was the site of “7-Mile House” (seven miles to downtown Chicago), a homestead and inn at which travelers might stop on their way to or from Chicago. Abraham Lincoln may have stopped there in 1860 during his first campaign for President and, for the past 25 years, Senn Park has been home to Charles Keck’s “The Young Lincoln” statue.

The Edgewater Historical Society is pleased to invite you to join Ald. Harry Osterman, retired Ald. Mary Ann Smith, DePaul University historian Mark Pohlad, and other elected officials and guests, to commemorate Lincoln in Edgewater on Friday, April 29, at 1 p.m. in Senn Park, 5887 N. Ridge Ave., Chicago. Light refreshments will be served.

Chicago History Book Group (Past)

The next meeting of the Chicago History Book Club will be Saturday, April 30, 2022 at 2:00 p.m. in the Betty A. Barclay Community Room at the Edgewater Branch of the Chicago Public Library, 6000 N. Broadway.

This program will be in-person, but socially distanced, and with limited participants. Please go to the library’s event calendar to register. If you were unable to attend in person, the event was recorded.

The meeting format is different this time, in that it will be primarily a panel discussion. The books to be discussed are: “Boss” and “Sez Who? Sez Me” by Mike Royko, and “Royko: A Life in Print” by F. Richard Ciccone. Click here for a flyer.

2022 Annual Meeting (Past)

Will QuamThe Edgewater Historical Society invites you to the 2022 Annual Meeting, presenting candidates for your Board of Directors and telling you about plans for 2022-23. The meeting will be on Saturday, March 19, 2022 at 10:30 a.m. in the Betty A. Barclay Community Room of the Edgewater Library, 6000 N. Broadway. Click here for a flyer.

Our speaker, Will Quam, architecture photographer and historian, will chronicle the history of brick architecture in Chicago, and feature his photographs of some of his favorite “piles of bricks” in Edgewater and neighborhoods across Chicago.

Face masks are required. The program is free to the Public.

Chicago History Book Group (Past)

The next meeting of the Chicago History Book Club will be Saturday, February 19, 2022 at 10:00 a.m. in the Betty A. Barclay Community Room at the Edgewater Branch of the Chicago Public Library, 6000 N. Broadway.

This program will be in-person, but socially distanced, and with limited participants. Please go to the library’s event calendar (bit.ly/ehsbook3) to register.

The book to be discussed is: “Black Boy” By Richard Wright. Click here for a flyer.

Art Hidden in Plain Sight (Past)

Saturday, December 4, 2021, 11:00 a.m. at the Museum

One of the world’s most remarkable outdoor art treasures lies hidden in plain sight along Chicago’s Lake Michigan waterfront: carvings in the old limestone revetments that line much of the lakeshore. William Swislow has documented thousands of revetment carvings. He’ll show examples of this art underfoot, tell its story, and discuss the carvers who made it.

The event is free, but attendance is limited to 25, so reservations are required. Click here for more information.

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